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Miura Miura originality/preservation/restoration details thread.

Discussion in 'Lamborghini Supercars' started by vfinaldi, Jun 21, 2019.

  1. joe sackey

    joe sackey Three Time F1 World Champ
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    What a special thread, thank you for sharing, the restorative process is an important factor in the future desirability & value of these cars.
     
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  2. vfinaldi

    vfinaldi Formula Junior
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    I understand there were three different alternators used in the Miura throughout the production, each with successively higher amps to accommodate the added electrics (windows, radio, A/C). Does anyone know the Bosch part numbers for the three types and the amperages?
     
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  3. vfinaldi

    vfinaldi Formula Junior
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    It’s been a while since I posted so here is a quick update on the restoration. Below are photos of the epoxy primered front and rear bonnets. As primers are catalyzed, it’s important to provide them enough time to dry completely, to insure shrinkage is complete. Often times, a shop will rush this process. Without sufficient drying times for materials, paint flaws can appear down the road. Patience!
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  4. vfinaldi

    vfinaldi Formula Junior
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  5. vfinaldi

    vfinaldi Formula Junior
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    Original P400 muffler outlets rusted and unavailable? No problem, Cairati just manufactures new ones templated from the originals!
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  6. vfinaldi

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  7. vfinaldi

    vfinaldi Formula Junior
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  8. vfinaldi

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  9. vfinaldi

    vfinaldi Formula Junior
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    You asked for it. Here is a video of the engine setup and break-in period. This is where the engine is set up, the carburetors are adjusted and tuned, the timing checked and corrected, and the engine is broken in. Turn up the sound!
     
  10. vfinaldi

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    Ok, one more P400 engine dyno video. This one was taken after the engine was broken in and preliminary adjustments were done. Here, they are doing engine pulls to specified RPM's.
     
  11. cnpapa24

    cnpapa24 Formula Junior
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    Sounds like an angry bull!
     
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  12. vfinaldi

    vfinaldi Formula Junior
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    It’s been a while since I updated this thread. The bodywork is now complete and below are pics of the “body in white.” Gaps have been set, blocking complete, and now the body is in final primer coat and curing for a total of 75 days to insure all shrinkage occurs before final finish scuff and then color coat. Next, I will post a video of the finished body after final pre-assembly.
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  13. vfinaldi

    vfinaldi Formula Junior
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    Quick video of the "body in white" after final pre-assembly:
     
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  14. NürScud

    NürScud Formula Junior

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    Excuse my ignorance but why so long for the curing process?
     
  15. vfinaldi

    vfinaldi Formula Junior
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    That is a great question! The answer is a little complicated, but I will try to boil it down.

    All modern automotive primers (and paints) are catalyzed, meaning when they are mixed with a catalyst (hardener) and exposed to air, they dry. Things can be done to speed the drying time, such as using a heated booth or additives. Now, primers dry to the touch in x amount of time, and dry to the point you can sand them in y amount of time. However, just because they are dry to sand in y amount of time does not mean they are completely dry. They continue to dry for a period of time past both x and y. In summer months, the time is shorter due to the heat. In humid climates the time can be a bit longer. In winter months, due to the cold, longer still. Why is this important? Because as they dry, they shrink...it's a natural byproduct of the catalyzation process (in which heat is released as well). Good primers will shrink very little. Bad primers will shrink a lot. This is the name of the game in the primer "chemical" business.

    Now, most quality shops will do a final "scuff" sanding of the final primer coat once it has dried to sanding point ("y" above)...usually a couple days after it the primer was applied. Then they will paint the color coat, and clear coat (if two stage), and once dry (usually a couple days), they will cut and buff it to a glorious finish. Some even sand between color coats/clear coats as well. When done, it will look perfect...like a mirror. HOWEVER...there is always a "but."

    But the problem that can result is, if the primer below that color coat (and clear if two stage) continues to catalyze (dry) thereafter, flaws will begin to appear in the paint surface after you have cut and buffed it. Sometimes it will take days, sometimes months. Sometimes after a car has been left out in the hot sun all day (facilitating catalyzation). Have you ever gone to a shop (and I am not talking about low-level collision shops, I am talking about high quality restoration/paint shops) and seen a car under final assembly after paint and polish? Have you ever looked closely at the paint, from an angle, with proper lighting, and seen sanding marks, etc., in or below the surface? This is how that happens. It's not the quality of the paint work. It's the lack of adequate drying time. Either the primer below has continued to catalyze after color coat, or the color coat was not given enough time to dry properly before it was cut and buffed, or both, and it/they shrank afterwards, resulting in a finish that shows sanding marks.

    Why do shops do this? Simple...time. Most shops do not want to have a car sit at their shop, being stored, for weeks or months while the final primer coat, or color coat, fully catalyzes and dries.

    Another reason to allow a long drying time is because sometimes, there may be flaws in the primer itself, or in the application process (greasy fingerprint under the primer for example) that will cause it to flaw, or even crack, several weeks after application, after full catalyzation. If you paint the color coat too quickly, that will happen after you have painted, cut and polished the car. Then, it will require a repair which includes sanding the area, potentially blending, etc., and if the car is assembled, that means dust, potential for scratches, and a paint finish that shows the repair. Not a good thing. If you discover it after this longer drying time, but before color coat application, it can easily be remedied before color coat is applied, while the car is still disassembled.

    So, the short answer is time heals all wounds. If you have the time, it's best to allow primers and paints time to catalyze fully before moving onto the next step. It results in a much better and more reliable end result. In the meantime, parts and other systems can be worked on so the restoration project moves along.
     

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